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Security (FAQ)

Why is LACNIC trying to hack into my computer?

This information is incorrect. Some computer security programs (firewalls) can be configured to search for IP address information in other registries' databases, and these may not have the most accurate information.

Many of these programs are configured to search for information in the databases maintained by ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers), which is the organization responsible for registering and assigning IP addresses in the North American region.

LACNIC is the organization responsible for registering and assigning IP addresses to organizations in Latin America and Caribbean.

There are five regional Internet registries worldwide:

APNIC the regional Internet registry for the Asia Pacific region;
ARIN the regional Internet registry for North America;
LACNIC   the regional Internet registry for Latin America and the Caribbean;
RIPE NCC the regional Internet registry for Europe;
AFRINIC the regional Internet registry for Africa.

Therefore, if your firewall searches other databases instead of LACNIC's, you will only obtain generic information that simply states that a particular IP address is under LACNIC's responsibility.

Note that the information provided by our database is authoritative and should be used as an accurate source of information. To search our database you can use the whois service.

So, how can I obtain the most accurate information available regarding the person responsible for the IP address that is trying to hack into my computer?

Any information regarding the IP addresses assigned by LACNIC can be obtained using the WHOIS tool in two different ways:

What kind of information does the Whois tool provide?

The Whois tool provides, among other information, the name of organization to which the IP address or ASN was assigned as well as its postal address, technical and administrative contacts, DNS servers, and registration date.

In this case the most important information is the organization to which an address was assigned and its points of contact (technical and administrative).

The Whois tool identifies this information as follows:

The owner-c and tech-c fields will only show the codes assigned by LACNIC's system. The contacts' complete information can be found in the response provided by the Whois tool itself, including the contacts' name, email address, postal address and telephone number.

  • owner: Name of the organization to which the IP address was assigned
  • owner-c: The organization's administrative contact
  • tech-c: Technical contact for the IP address

What should I do if the information provided by the Whois tool is incorrect?

Organizations receiving IP addresses from LACNIC are required to update their information.

If you notice any incorrect information, please notify LACNIC at hostmaster@lacnic.net specifying the IP address that contains invalid information.

What should I do in case of an attack?

You should contact the organization responsible for the IP address that originated the attack, emailing the organization's point of contact (see question 15) to politely request that they identify who is using this IP address and take the necessary measures according to acceptable use policies.

The message should include the IP address that originated the attack and the time that it occurred. This information should be available on your firewall's logs.

Can't LACNIC go after the user of this IP address?

LACNIC does not have the legal means to take action against attackers; neither does LACNIC have the necessary technical means to do so, as this is an ISP's user, not LACNIC's.

LACNIC is simply the entity responsible for registering and assigning the resources (IPv4, IPv6 and ASN), and it is only responsible for providing information about the organization to which a certain resource has been assigned.

I've received a lot of unsolicited emails (spam), and certain security software has identified LACNIC as the sender. Why is that?

Some security programs are configured to query ARIN's database to determine who is responsible for an IP address. That database contains only generic information that states that a particular IP address is under LACNIC's responsibility, but this does not mean that LACNIC is sending the unsolicited emails.

In this case you should contact the organization responsible for the IP address that originated the spam.

Can't LACNIC simply remove my email address from these spam distribution lists?

LACNIC does not send unsolicited emails (spam), nor does it maintain any email distribution lists.

How can I protect myself against unsolicited email?

Some recommendations on how to protect yourself against spam or minimize the problem:

More useful tips can be found at:
"Fight Spam on the Internet!"
"Documentos Produzidos pelo NBSO"

  • Never reply to spam messages, as this will only confirm that your email address is valid.
  • Notify those responsible for the IP address where the spam is originating; often they don't know that their computer is being used for this purpose.
  • Don't publish your email address on websites you don't trust. If an online shopping site requires an email address, you can use a free address that can later discarded.

What are legacy resources?

Legacy resources are those that were assigned before the creation of Regional Internet Registries (RIRs). All Internet resources (IP address blocks or ASNs) assigned prior to December 28, 1997 are regarded as legacy resources.

Are there any differences between legacy and non-legacy resources?

No. Both are valid Internet resources and can be used normally by the organization to which they ere allocated/assigned. This differentiation is important because non-legacy resources have been assigned by RIRs according to policies proposed and approved by each region's community. Organizations with legacy resources are generally not members of LACNIC, unless they have also been assigned IPv6 addresses.

More information.

Can an organization with a legacy IP address block request additional blocks?

Any organization that has custody of a legacy block can request additional blocks. To request an additional block you must complete the form available at IPv4 blocks to providers (ISP) o IPv4 blocks for End Users and include it in the body of an email to hostmaster@lacnic.net.

To justify the assignment of an additional block, the organization will have to provide data showing efficient utilization of the previous block.

After the additional block is approved, the previous block will no longer be considered legacy and the organization will become a member of LACNIC. LACNIC member organizations will be assigned a category based on the size of the previous and the additional blocks.

More information on membership categories and fees.

Can legacy resources be managed with LACNIC's resource management system?

All resources under LACNIC's responsibility can be managed through LACNIC's web-based system.

Some resources were transferred from ARIN to LACNIC, and these need to be updated before they can be managed with the web-based system.

How can I update the information on legacy resources?

The aim of updating the resources transferred to LACNIC is to associate the resource with a technical contact and with the administrative contact of the responsible organization.

To perform this update you must follow the procedure described in
http://lacnic.net/sp/update.html

Sometimes it is also necessary to correct or modify the name of the organization. In this case you should request that the resource be transferred.

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What type of Internet resources does LACNIC assign?

Any organization in the cobertura de LACNIC,an request the following Internet resources:

  • IPv4 address block
  • IPv6 address blocks
  • Autonomous System Numbers

How can I request an IP address block or ASN from LACNIC?

When requesting IP addresses from LACNIC there are two options: if the IP addresses will be used in your own infrastructure and will not be sub-assigned to your clients, you can request resources as an End User; if you provide Internet services and plan to sub-assign IP addresses to your customers, you can request resources as an ISP. Applicable policies and membership fees vary in both cases.

To begin the application process you must complete the corresponding form and include it in the body of an email to hostmaster@lacnic.net. The policies and corresponding application form to apply as an END-USER, the policies and application form to apply as an ISP.

To apply for an autonomous system number (ASN) you must complete the corresponding form and include it in the body of an email to hostmaster@lacnic.net. The applicable policies and corresponding form is available at Services ASN

What are the requirements for receiving an IP address block from LACNIC?

The requirements for receiving IP address blocks from LACNIC if your organization is an ISP or if your organization is an End User.

I requested an ASN for my organization. The request was approved and the ASN was assigned; however, I have not received the IP address block. What should I do?

ASN requests do not include an IP address block. These are two distinct requests that have to be submitted separately using the proper templates.

If your organization needs an ASN and an IP address block, you should submit two separate requests: one for the ASN, the other for the IP address block (see question 29).

My organization is starting its operations as a provider and does not yet have any IP addresses. Can we request some from LACNIC?

LACNIC has an immediate assignment policy, the aim of which is to serve those organizations that have made significant investments to start their operations as service or connectivity providers but don't yet have the necessary IP addresses.

For further details on the applicable policy, see "2.3.3.3. Direct Allocations to Internet Service Providers"

My IP address block application has been approved, we have signed the Registration Services Agreement and sent it to LACNIC, but we have not received our IP address block yet. What else do we have to do?

After an application is approved, the organization must sign the Registration Services Agreement and pay the registration fee according to the organization's category. So, in addition to the agreement, you should check if this fee was paid. For further information regarding payments, you can contact facturacion@lacnic.net

My IP address block application has been approved, we have signed the Registration Services Agreement and sent it to LACNIC, but we have not received our IP address block yet. What else do we have to do?

After an application is approved, the organization must sign the Registration Services Agreement and pay the registration fee according to the organization's category. You should check if two copies of this agreement were signed and sent to LACNIC.

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